Waiting for Gravity, the new film by Alfonso Cuarón

3 Oct

The number one reason why Fall Season is my favorite season of the year is movies. This year the list is long and very interesting, but there is one movie in particular that has caught my attention.

“Gravity” is a new film opening on Friday, October 4th, by one of my favorite movie directors, Alfonso Cuarón. It stars George Clooney and Sandra Bullock, so just by reading the cast I’m already in.

I’ve heard great reviews all over the place (like this one from Joe Morgenstern at the WSJ) and the theme is intriguing: imagine being lost and floating in space and trying to get back to earth without anything to hold on to. Claro que a mucha gente ya le pasa, some people are so despistados that they seem lost in space even while they are walking the earth, tanto que you don’t know what hit them… but I digress.

Here is the trailer so you get an idea. Pero, ¡AGARRÉNSE!

 

I was especially surprised to learn that in this film, Mr. Cuarón worked with his son Jonás co-writing the screenplay. OMG. Who knew he had a son that was so grown up? Last Sunday the LA Times had a great article about their working relationship, which you can read here. Making movies is typically a family affair for Alfonso Cuarón, who had already worked with his brother Carlos before, most notably in “Y Tu Mamá También” which was nominated for several Oscars.

If you grew up in México in the 1980′s, you remember “Sólo Con Tu Pareja,” the first película mexicana you went to see at the movie theater that was actually good, funny and well made. It was written, produced and directed by Mr. Cuarón and it became a big hit. This was a movie en español unlike anything we had seen before, with young and socially affluent people in Mexico City in a comedy of errors.  The story, the actors were all different from all the churros and B-stuff  produced in Mexico, things you had no intention of ever seeing. The Mexican Film Industry was  in shambles in the late 1980′s, and Alfonso Cuarón’s “Sólo Con Tu Pareja” changed all that. 

So you can bet I’m going to go see this one at the IMAX theater, getting my supersize popcorn and fastening my seat belt.

Just by looking at the trailer I’m extremely concerned and flying by the seat of my pants for Sandra Bullock. ¡Pobrecita! How can she survive? But if anyone is going to rescue her in outer space, it might as well be our favorite hunk, el George Clooney. Go George! Tú puedes, corazón. I wouldn’t mind being lost in a galaxy far, far away if I was lost with you, baby.

The nice people over at Warner Brothers sent us a few pix of the premiere this week in New York. I thought you’d enjoy them as much as I did. 

Let’s go see Gravity and hope they make it. As Cantinflas said in one of his movies,  “La gravedad, señores…¡depende del trancazo!”

(Disclaimer: This is not a sponsored post. I just love good movies and talented filmmakers.)

New York, New York - 10/01/2013 - Warner Bros. Picture News Presents The New York Premiere of "Gravity". The Film stars George Clooney and Sandra Bullock and was directed by Alfonso Cuaron .

New York, New York – 10/01/2013 – Warner Bros. Picture News Presents The New York Premiere of “Gravity”. The Film stars George Clooney and Sandra Bullock and was directed by Alfonso Cuaron . Photo Courtesy of Warner Brothers.

-PICTURED: Jonas Cuaron,George Clooney,Sandra Bullock,Alfonso Cuaron,David Heyman  -PHOTO by: Dave Allocca/Startraksphoto.com

Jonas Cuaron,George Clooney,Sandra Bullock,Alfonso Cuaron,David Heyman
-PHOTO by: Dave Allocca/Startraksphoto.com- Photo Courtesy of Warner Brothers.

There is chemistry here. George Clooney and Sandra Bullock greet each other at the premiere of Gravity in New York. Photo Courtesy of Warner Brothers.

There is chemistry here. George Clooney and Sandra Bullock greet each other at the premiere of Gravity in New York. Photo Courtesy of Warner Brothers.

Oh hey...it's George Clooney. Photo courtesy of Warner Brothers.

Oh hey…it’s George Clooney. Photo courtesy of Warner Brothers.

From the LA Times article last Sunday, father and son Alfonso Cuarón and Jonás Cuarón, co-writers of Gravity.

From the LA Times article last Sunday, like father, like son: Alfonso Cuarón and Jonás Cuarón.

Cooking with Bricia Lopez al estilo Guelaguetza @Macys

1 Oct
Bricia Lopez presented recipes from Guelaguetza Restaurant and inspired us to eat more comida oaxaqueña.

Bricia Lopez presented recipes from Guelaguetza Restaurant and inspired us to eat more comida oaxaqueña.

Do you love comida oaxaqueña? I do. The more I learn about Oaxaca, a beautiful state in México, the more I want to visit again.

Last Saturday, the lovely ladies from Macy’s Special Events hosted Bricia Lopez at their Macy’s Home Store in South Coast Plaza for a cooking demo. We learned 3 new recipes inspired by the famous Guelaguetza Restaurant owned by Bricia’s family in Los Angeles.

A nice crowd, mostly English speaking, turned out for the event, and we were all delighted with the dishes Bricia presented and taught us how to make.

A very attentive crowd showed up at Macy's Home Store, South Coast Plaza.

A very attentive crowd showed up at Macy’s Home Store, South Coast Plaza.

We had Red Mole-Black Bean Soup, Chileajo Tostadas, and Jamaica Mint Lemonade.  Se me hace agua la boca just by typing. Everything was delicious.  

Preparing the Red Mole-Black Bean Soup.

Preparing the Red Mole-Black Bean Soup.

Thank you Bricia and Macy’s for the recipes and the great event. Ya compré mis dos moles para aventarme unas recetas. 

And from what I heard from some of the people attending, yo creo que ya tenemos mas converts to authentic Mexican food en el OC, even if they have to travel up the 405 North to get to LA and find it. Mole is an exciting thing and definitely worth a trip to Guelaguetza. I’m glad people are expanding their horizons beyond the typical commercial stuff and willing to give it a try.

(DISCLAIMER: This is not a sponsored post, nor have I been compensated in any way, shape or form for my opinion by anyone mentioned here. I just happen to rave about the things/events that I love, especially if it involves good food.)

Next up, A Taste of Mexico, where Guelaguetza and many other Mexican restaurants will feature their cuisine for the ever expanding Angeleno fan base de la comida mexicana. It’s happening October 11 at La Plazita de la Cultura y Artes. You can find more info here on their website: A Taste of Mexico.

Can't wait to try out my Moles: Mole Negro y Mole Rojo from Guelaguetza.

Can’t wait to try out my Moles: Mole Negro y Mole Rojo from Guelaguetza.

I’m including  the recipe for the Red Mole Black Bean Soup, from Restaurante Guelaguetza. You can purchase their moles (several varieties) and visit their website at www.iLoveMole.com.

Red Mole- Black Bean Soup (Serves 4)

Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons grape seed or corn oil
  • 1 large yellow onion, diced small
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • Kosher salt and ground pepper to taste
  • 1/2 cup Guelaguetza Mole Rojo paste
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar
  • 3 cups vegetable broth
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 1/2 cup Mexican sour cream
  • 1 tablesspoon ground coriander
  • Salt and Pepper to taste
  • Tortilla strips (for garnish, optional)

Directions: In a medium bowl, stir in Guelaguetza Mole Rojo paste, apple cider vinegar, and about a 1/2 cup of vegetable broth. Stir with a spatula until the mole paste has fully dissolved. Reserve.

In a medium pot, put oil over medium heat. When oil is hot, add the onions and cook, stirring until soft, about 5 minutes. Stir in the garlic, cumin and about 1/2 teaspoon salt. Cook until fragrant, about a minute or two.

Stir in Guelaguetza Mole Rojo mix, vegetable broth, black beans and season with salt and pepper. Raise the heat to medium-high. Once the soup has come to a boil, lower the heat to medium-low to simmer, stirring occasionally for about 15 minutes.

While the soup cooks, combine sour cream, coriander, salt and pepper to taste in a small bowl. Reserve for garnish.

In a small bowl, combine the cornstarch and about 1 tablespoon of cold water, stir to combine.  After the soup has cooked for about 15 minutes, transfer 2 cups of it to  blender and add the cornstarch mixture. Puree until smooth. Return to pot. Cook, stirring until soup thickens, about 2 minutes.

Serve in bowls and garnish with the Coriander Crema. Top with tortilla strips if desired. ¡Provecho!

BRICIALOPEZ1

Visiting Gabriel Figueroa @LACMA

28 Sep

Mexico has a long history of amazing cinematographers, but none is more beautiful nor visually eloquent as Gabriel Figueroa.

Gabriel Figueroa was a master of light and shadows, one of the most prolific Mexican cinematographers who shot the films that are representative of the Epoca de Oro del Cine Mexicano. He worked with the most famous directors and actors of his day and helped create a collective image of a time and place in Mexico that existed mostly in black and white. And the remarkable thing is he did it with a film camera, a light meter, and film negatives. Remember those? There weren’t any computers, no Photoshop nor digital tools back in the 1940′s. 

LACMA recently opened a new exhibit featuring his work and influence. “Under the Mexican Sky-Gabriel Figueroa: Art and Film” is a joint project between LACMA, The Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences, Televisa, Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes and Conaculta. I’m glad all these organizations got together to make this happen because there aren’t usually many exhibits dedicated to cinematography. This is a real treat.

As you walk through the hall you see montages on large screens of his films with the directors El “Indio” Fernandez and Luis Buñuel. What struck me most was how much a single image, a still frame of a moving shot, could be a stand alone piece of art.

Those images convey beauty, sadness, pride, melancholy or just profound admiration for the landscape and scenery, el paisaje mexicano. I was also struck by how much women cried in these stories- puro melodrama y sufrimiento- and how men were  always “engrandecidos y valientes” almost to a fault. There are bits of his work from the movies Flor Silvestre, Maria Candelaria, Enamorada, Bugambilia, La Perla, Maclovia, Un Dia de Vida, Los Olvidados, among many others. 

You also see the influence painters such as Diego Rivera and Jose Clemente Orozco had on Figueroa’s work. It was like he was applying film to their paintings. My dear friend Alex Munguia used to tell me that if I wanted to take better photographs, then I should study famous painters and try to emulate what they did. Of course he was right, but it became completely evident to me once I saw the relationship between Diego Rivera’s Murals of the Mexican Revolution and Gabriel Figueroa’s Cinematography. Isn’t it interesting how different art forms relate and influence each other? The medium is different, but both are equally powerful.

Mr. Figueroa lived to be 90 years old and stayed active in film and the arts until the end. I hope you can go admire his work in this fabulous exhibit. It runs until February 2, 2014.

Gabriel Figueroa in 1945 during the filming of "La Perla" (Dir. Emilio "Indio" Fernandez)

Gabriel Figueroa in 1945 during the filming of “La Perla” (Dir. Emilio “Indio” Fernandez)

Los ojos de Maria Félix, forever immortalized by the lens of Gabriel Figueroa.

Los ojos de Maria Félix, forever immortalized by the lens of Gabriel Figueroa.

There are plenty of screens with montages of his works as well as still shots and other memorabilia.

There are plenty of screens with montages of his work, as well as still shots and other memorabilia.

Mexican beauties as observed by Gabriel Figueroa, who wa snot afraid of the extreme close up. Among his leading ladies are Maria Félix, Dolores del Rio and Columba Dominguez.

Mexican beauties as observed by Gabriel Figueroa, who was not afraid of the extreme close up. Among his leading ladies are Maria Félix, Dolores del Rio and Columba Dominguez.

Maria Félix and Columba Dominguez in a dramatic moment.

Maria Félix and Columba Dominguez in a dramatic moment.

"Dia de Flores" by Diego Rivera, apr of the exhibit and cited as one of the references in Gabriel Figueroa's cinematography.

“Dia de Flores” by Diego Rivera, part of the exhibit and cited as one of the references in Gabriel Figueroa’s cinematography.

Even if she wanted to look ordinary, Maria Félix was stunning on screen.

Even if she wanted to look ordinary, Maria Félix was stunning on screen.

The contrast, shadows and light are simply beautiful.

The contrast, shadows and light are simply beautiful.

Un paisaje con la "Mujer Dormida" al fondo.

Un paisaje con la “Mujer Dormida” al fondo.

Pedro Armendariz in all his glory.

Pedro Armendariz in all his glory.

Para mi, Roberto Cañedo is the most attractive man in Mexican Cinema. Here he romances Columba Dominguez.

Para mi, Roberto Cañedo is the most attractive man in Mexican Cinema. Here he romances Columba Dominguez.

Posters from Mexican movies, in different languages.

Posters from Mexican movies, in different languages.

Gabriel Figueroa checking his negatves in 1994. This photograph was taken by his son, Gabriel Figueroa Flores.

Gabriel Figueroa checking his negatives in 1994. This photograph was taken by his son, Gabriel Figueroa Flores.

EntradaGabrielFigueroa

Go see this exhibit on view at LACMA.

Go see this exhibit on view at LACMA.

Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month in LA

25 Sep

Are you enjoying your Hispanic Heritage Month? There’s a lot going on to celebrate it, even if nosotros los Hispanics never actually need a specific reason. But it’s nice to have a whole month dedicated to observing the fact that los Hispanos somos lo máximo. 

One of the perks of living in Los Angeles is that we have no shortage of events, be it Hispanic Heritage Month or not. The last 2 weeks in September and first 2 weeks of October are actually jammed packed with lots to do, see and eat. So let’s go celebrate.

I received an invitation from Macy’s to attend an event which I’d like to share here and invite you to attend.

Our resident Oaxacan ambassador in LA and all around super cool lady, Bricia López, will be hosting a cooking demo and presentation this Saturday Sept. 28th at 2 p.m. at Macy’s South Coast Plaza, where she’ll bring some of her best loved Mole dishes from the famous La Guelaguezta restaurant in LA.

Bricia is synonymous with good food and you may have heard about her on NPR, the LA Times, among others. She is proud and passionate about representing Oaxaca, its food, delicacies, art and Mezcal. If you love good food, I would make it a point of being there. Tickets are $5 and they benefit La Plazita de la Cultura y las Artes.

Bricia at Macys

Speaking of La Plazita de la Cultura y las Artes, I recently had the chance to visit for the first time and I fell in love with the place. If you haven’t been and you’re interested in learning more about the history of los mexicanos en Los Angeles, you need to go visit. You can find information on their website here: www.lapca.org

La Plazita is located just across the street from Plazita Olvera in DTLA and it’s a small but very well thought out museum. They have rotating exhibits, plus spaces dedicated to the braceros, Mexican zoot suits, several artists and a very cool representation of life in DTLA in the 1920′s. The grounds ouside are perfect for kids running around and just hanging out with la familia.

Here are some pictures from La Plazita. Hope you have a chance to go and support it.

Entrance to La Plazita de la Cultura y las Artes in DTLA.

Entrance to La Plazita de la Cultura y las Artes in DTLA.

You can enjoy great exhibits and graphics around the museum.

You can enjoy great exhibits and graphics around the museum.

Plazita art

Maria Isabel Santiago, 15 years old, and her painting "El Gran Azul." She is part of the PAINT program at the Los Angeles Music and Arts School in East LA.

Maria Isabel Santiago, 15 years old, and her painting “El Gran Azul.” She is part of the PAINT program at the Los Angeles Music and Arts School in East LA.

Kids from East LA participated in this project.

Kids from East LA participated in this project.

Plazita Plaza Studio

On the second floor there is a recreation of La Calle Principal- Main Street today- from the 1920′s in Los Angeles. A creative and hands on experience.

A clothing store just as you would see it in the 1920's on Main street.

A clothing store just as you would see it in the 1920′s on Main street.

Another view inside the clothing store.

Another view inside the clothing store.

This was especially exciting for me, a photo studio recreation from the 1920's where families would dress up and g take "la foto del recuerdo" which woud be passed on as an heirloom form generation to generation.

This was especially exciting for me, a photo studio recreation from the 1920′s where families would dress up and take “la foto del recuerdo” which woud be passed on as an heirloom from generation to generation.

Here's a closer view with an explanation of how significant it was to go to the photo studio to get your portrait done...Those were the days! Now it's just a "selfie" on your phone that will probably never be seen by future generations.

Here’s a closer view with an explanation of how significant it was to go to the photo studio to get your portrait done…Those were the days! Now it’s just a “selfie” on your phone that will probably never be seen by future generations.

Another view.

Another view.

Th museum is inside the beautiful Brunswig Buiding and Plaza House.

The museum is inside the beautiful Brunswig Buiding and Plaza House.

Cante y cante con @CafeTacvba en DTLA

6 Sep

Hace una semana exactamente, you would’ve found me singing my heart out con el repertorio de Cafe Tacvba en concierto en el Nokia Theater de Downtown LA. Tenía rato que no los veía en persona, y ahora, I’m obsessed.

I don’t say this lightly: este fue uno de los mejores conciertos a los que he ido en mi vida. Y más gusto fue darme cuenta que sigue siendo lo máximo verlos en vivo. Rubén, Meme, Joselo y Quique, son otra cosa…¿cómo le hacen? De dónde sacan esa creatividad, esa música? Son completamente originales y super cool, but without even trying too hard. En vivo le echan muchas ganas, le ponen mucho feeling, y las canciones traen buen rollo para hacerte pensar. Mucho “emotional juju” going on in every song if you ask me.

Ya tienen más de 20 años cantando, pero our favorite Chilanga Banda proved they have no fear mixing it up, getting dark, getting serious, getting jazzy, getting techno and getting jiggy with it.  En una de esas, los 4 muestran sus mejores “dance moves” y una coreografía para una de sus canciones mas intensas, la de “Déjate Caer”, y bailan bastante bien, por cierto.

Cantaron sus crowd pleasers y grandes éxitos, esos que te sabes de memoria, pero también aprovecharon para darle a las nuevas canciones de su último disco, “El Objeto Antes Llamado Disco”…  Yo que era fan desde hace tiempo pero que no había escuchado este disco, me enganché de las canciones.

(Claro que cuando fui a buscar el CD a las tiendas esta semana, me cayó el 20 del título. YA NO HAY DISCOS!! Por ende, the wordplay. Había puros empty shelves en la Target, en el Best Buy y hasta en la Walmart. Lo tuve que hacer special order por Barnes and Noble porque ahi me dieron free shipping. Quiero mi CD tangible, para llevarmelo en mi carro, para prestarlo if I have to. Pero más que nada, quiero mi disco porque parece que muy pronto será un collector’s item. But I digress…)

Esta experiencia la debo gracias a mi amiga, the lovely Lucia Peraza, quien me hizo la invitación. Lucia estaba celebrando su concierto #40 de Cafe Tacvba, a Guiness World Record if you ask me, proving she is the ultimate “Chica Banda”… And she still gets excited with every song.  Además, nos tocó estar en el pit, standing room only, y los vimos muy cerca. It was awesome, and let me tell you, once you go to the pit, you never want to go back.

So I can’t say this enough, GO SEE THEM on tour. Si les gusta alguna canción de su repertorio, la que sea, I highly recommend you experience the music in person. Check out their USA tour sked here on their webpage. Todavía quedan algunas fechas.

Por ahora, mi nueva canción favorita de ellos (aparte de Eres, aparte de Como Te Extraño, aparte de Puntos Cardinales, aparte de Volver a Comenzar) se llama “Olita de Altamar” y es algo mágico escucharla en persona. 

Aquí les pongo el link al video, a mi me pone de muy buen humor.

Y aqui les pongo unas fotitos con el iPhone del concierto el 30 de agosto en LA. 

Tacvba1

El concierto de Cafe Tacvba en el Nokia el 30 de agosto estuvo sold out.

Un árbol gigante de repente se levantó sobre el escenario, very cool!

Un árbol gigante de repente se levantó sobre el escenario, very cool!

Joselo Rangel es lo máximo.

Joselo Rangel es lo máximo.

Backstage con Cafe Tacvba, pura gente cool.

Backstage con Cafe Tacvba.

Otro angulo

El director de cine Sergio Arau en plena plática con Rubén, aka "Zopilote".

El director de cine Sergio Arau en plena plática con Rubén, aka “Zopilote”.

Puro genio y creatividad, Rubén Albarrán y Gustavo Santolalla, uno de los productores de "El Objeto Antes Llamado Disco".

Puro genio y creatividad, Rubén Albarrán y Gustavo Santolalla, uno de los productores de “El Objeto Antes Llamado Disco” de Cafe Tacvba.

El Meme tiene su pegue. Ladies Like Meme...

El Meme tiene su pegue. Ladies love Meme!

Must See Documentary Discovery: Reportero

23 Aug
A documentary by Bernardo Ruiz.

A documentary by Bernardo Ruiz.

Here is a documentary that I found online through PBS and that has hit close to home.

“Reportero” follows the experience of Sergio Haro Cordero, a reporter in Tijuana, and the editorial team of the independent “Zeta” newspaper in recent years. It is an excellent film directed and produced by Bernardo Ruiz, and from now until September 20, 2013 you can watch it online at PBS for free with this link:

http://www.pbs.org/pov/reportero/full.php#.UhcH_q79XYs

Or you can go to the POV page from PBS and click on the selection: http://www.pbs.org/pov/

This is not a particularly “feel good movie” nor an easy story to watch, but it’s important to see it. 

Journalism is a tough profession, especially when your life is at risk for pursuing the truth and writing it.  As we know, Mexico does not have a good track record in protecting its journalists nor its citizens- far from it- and this documentary is an eye opener to all the things they are exposed to in this day and age. It has definitely made me aware of how valuable their work is, and I admire them even more.  

About 15 years ago, I had the pleasure of being a colleague of Mr. Sergio Haro Cordero at my local newspaper. I wasn’t even done with college, I wasn’t even pursuing a serious career in journalism (me tocaba la seccion de Sociales, for crying out loud!) but I was impressed by his work ethic, integrity, professionalism (exactly what you see in the film) and generosity in teaching a “rookie” the ropes.

One time, I tagged along for an interview with the state governor (Ernesto Ruffo) and Sergio let me ask a few questions (and even took a picture of me doing so, for my scrapbook.) I remember him working nonstop, always on the beat, always had a camera in hand. It’s so amazing to see that time has not changed him one bit (maybe for a few extra canas en el pelo) and even more inspiring is to see his wife and son supporting him even with all the risks they face (¡que valientes!)… I am in awe of his story and the film. Además, I’m proud to still have the photos he took of my muy breve, pero divertido paso por el periodismo de Baja California. Espero poderlo saludar un día de estos para darle las gracias pues son de mis fotos favoritas.

On another note, Jesus Blancornelas, the founding editor of Zeta and one of the main characters in the film, also has a personal connection to my family. Era vecino y amigo de mis abuelos y hasta sirvio de testigo en la boda civil de mis padres, en los 70′s. Small world. Mi abuela se emociona mucho cuando los recuerda a él y a su esposa, Beba.

So if you have an hour, if you have the interest, please watch. I only regret not having seen it in the movie theater when it came out, but grateful to PBS for airing it now. Bernardo Ruiz y compañia, soy tu fan. 

No se lo pierdan.

Corazoncito de Cherry

6 Jun

My horoscope for the month of June (June, ALREADY, geez!) said that this month I was going to experience RESPONSIBILITY in different ways, shapes and forms.

I guess that’s one way of putting it, but really, these past 2 weeks have been kind of estresantes.  No estoy yo para contarlo, but sometimes I feel I’m not equipped to deal with life’s curve balls that are pitched without warning.

I admit I’m challenged in the “Actitud Mental Positiva” department, although I try to visualize good things and confess reading self-help books to get me out of my slumps. No me da pena decirlo. But these past few days, I’ve had to make extra efforts to improve my mood and energy, and hold on to all my santitos and mantras.

And then there’s moments, like today for example, when the small things suddenly have a big impact. Like when I walked into the 7 Eleven this morning, and Danny at the checkout counter had saved me a copy of the newspaper en español before it sold out. “Ya sabía que iba a venir a buscarlo.”  Made me smile and be grateful. Thanks Danny! I don’t know you but I appreciate the thoughtfulness. (I buy La Opinion for mi abuelita everyday,  but it’s frustrating sometimes because after 8 a.m. all the plomeros y constructores buy every copy in town and I have to drive around to find it. Really, La Opinion, can’t you provide subscription service in the South Bay?)

Or this afternoon when I went to Whole Foods and bought cherries on sale. The guy acomodando la fruta y la verdura said, “Here I picked these just for you.” Why thank you, nice guy.

I get home and wash them, put them in a bowl, proceed to eat them all as I’m watching the nightly news. All the way at the bottom, just as I was finishing them, a heart shaped cherry pops up. Un corazoncito. What are the odds? Así como para recordarme to practice an attitude of gratitude. 

So…not to read anything specific into it, but I’m taking it as a good sign. Better days ahead, people. Better days ahead. And more cherries.

cherry-1

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